20 April 2014

"Sauce" by Maya Paris

Contrary to popular belief, Second Life is not a dating site. A lot of people use it as one, but that's not actually what it is. I should know, I've been on Match.com com since forever, and I promise you, you can't build anything there and the fashion sense is less, um, exuberant. But because so many people use Second Life for hooking up, it makes perfect sense that the satirical Second Life artist Maya Paris has created an installation about personal ads, called Sauce: This Time It's Personal.

In her inimitable way, Maya pokes fun at our desperate and sometimes ridiculous efforts to find Someone, so frantically pursued in both the physical and the virtual worlds. Sometimes one just has to laugh at what we do; Sauce is one of those times. The installation has five areas:

"Sauce Factor," where you can try your luck to see just what sort of lover you are (NB -- I don't know what a gobby lover is, and I don't think I want to know):

"Sauce Factor," in Maya Paris's Sauce

The "Saucy Science Lab," where you can learn all about the science of sexual attraction:

"Saucy Science," in Maya Paris's Sauce
(Full disclosure: Maya tells me I'm to blame for one part of the lab; what can I say, whenever I meet Maya, sparks fly, as Francis Picabia can attest.)

"Dr Mildred's Modern Love Bureau," where you'll come across cases of (I think) actual British self-deprecating personal ads (one-liners, probably from the Age of Printed Newspapers), and you'll get very saucy with someone:

"Dr Mildred's Modern Love Bureau" in Maya Paris's Sauce

"The One," where truly, you will find The One (well, possibly two who are The One), and have a ball with him/her/it/them -- but first you have to have a blast:

Entry to "The One," in Maya Paris's Sauce

And finally, the secret seaside resort "Sauce Lido" (groaner pun), where there are lots of fun things to do, including driving around the pool in a beach chair, launching fireworks, throwing a tantrum, taking a very invigorating train ride, and laying about with a whole lotta fish and chips.

"Sauce Lido," in Maya Paris's Sauce

Maya has an obsession with food, usually fruit and fried eggs, but in Sauce the main one is that famous British comfort food, fish and chips. Why this time she's obsessed with fish and chips, I don't know. Maybe it's because fish and chips have a special sauce known as "vinegar," which tells you a lot about British love lives. Maybe fish and chips are a British aphrodisiac. Maybe vinegar is the British version of Love Potion #9 (which Sauce alludes to). Brits are strange.

Maya provides her usual array of fun gifts and an avatar -- all perfect for Date Night.

A number of elements in Sauce involve two people, so I strongly recommend that you see Sauce with a friend. Preferably a friend who likes you.

SLURL for Saucehttp://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/LEA25/36/176/1801

18 April 2014

The Russian Avant Garde at LEA8

I'll confess from the start: I'm completely prejudiced about the Russian avant-garde art of the early 20th century. Absolutely no neutrality at all. I love it -- pretty much all of it. Russian art during roughly 1910-1930 was immensely fertile. Most of the avant-garde artists were Constructivist or Futurist, but unlike the Italian Futurists, they were to a greater or lesser degree left wing, and they had a clear streak of whimsy and satire. Many created work for the stage. Before the Stalinists ended the movement, they created some of the boldest work of the era.

So when I learned that there's a tribute to it at the LEA8 sim, I dashed right over. And promptly turned into a gibbering jelly of joy.

The tribute is actually part of a huge exhibition in London created by Peter Greenaway and Saskia Boddeke (Rose). The official website is here, and there's an article from the BBC News about it here. The exhibition at LEA8 is necessarily relatively tiny, but nonetheless some of the best (and most fun) works of the period are reproduced, or in the case of two-dimensional drawings, rendered into 3D. They include:
  • Vladimir Tatlin's Tower, a tribute to the Third International
  • Black Square by Kazimir Malevich
  • Liubov Popova's stage construction for Vsevolod Meyerhold's production of The Magnanimous Cuckold, by Fernand Crommelynck (this is a personal favorite, being a work for theater)
  • Avatars (free!) based on drawings by El Lissitzky
Popova's set for The Magnanimous Cuckold, re-created by nessuno Myoo

El Lissitzky's "Old Man," re-created by Alpha Auer

One of the most impressive pieces is an original dance work by Jo Ellsmere, performed by five bots who sometimes merge. Their costumes are based on designs by one of the Russian avant-garde artists, though I couldn't recall who.

A moment from the bot dance choreographed by Jo Ellsmere

Much of the space in which the exhibition is being held was created by Bryn Oh (who also made the Tatlin Tower reconstruction), for the most part in a style similar to Constructivism. She also has some her signature elements around, such as the rotating antennas. Look closely at her stack of shopping carts.

The full list of artists involved is:
  • Alpha Auer
  • Bryn Oh
  • Caer Balogh
  • Eupalinos Ugajin
  • Jo Ellsmere
  • nessuno Myoo
  • Rose Borchovski
  • Soror Nishi
I do have one complaint: there doesn't seem to be a notecard with information about the whole exhibit. Notecards with bios of the individual artists, yes; an exhibit card, no. I visited three times, but never found or received one.

When I visited this exhibition before, I didn't know that it wasn't quite ready for the public. Now, at each installation there's a large number, which you can click to receive a notecard identifying the works. (The notecard describes all the pieces, so it's the same at each number.)

Part of an installation by Alpha Auer
Showing at LEA8, I don't know for how long. (Earth to LEA Committee: for pete's sake, get information out!)